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Attorney Alan J. Pransky

Smart homes and divorce

| Jul 21, 2018 | Abuse, Divorce |

People now have the ability to interact with their homes in a way that wasn’t even imagined ten years ago. We now have the ability to control things when we are away from our homes. We can turn lights and appliances on and off. We can change the temperature in the home by controlling the thermostat.  We can set off alarms, activate cameras and look inside the home, and speak through devices to people in the home and outside. We can track cars and cell phones. We can even monitor driving habits.
All of these smart applications are designed to make our lives better. However, they can allow a new type of abuse and harassment when a couple split up and one partner moves out of the home. The person out of the home can now control all of these devices and use them to annoy or abuse the partner in the home. Imagine the distress created if one partner finds out that their whereabouts have been tracked by a smart application on their phone or car. People can be hit with large heating and utility bills if the heat is turned up or lights turned on when a person isn’t home.
No matter how much trust exists within a marriage, precautions should be taken when a couple separate. The first thing that should be done is to change all passwords for all devices. You may be able to block the other partner from using the applications. All accounts for these items can be transferred into the name of the spouse in the home. The other thing that can be done is to get a court order that prohibits the other person from using the applications.
In most divorces, the partner remaining in the marital home obtains a court order that gives that person exclusive use of the home. Sometimes a similar order issues for use of cars. It is a simple matter to add language that prohibits the other partner from using any smart applications or devices that impact the home, car, or cellphone. Violation of this order can result in sanctions from the court.
Perhaps the biggest fear is that one spouse can track the movements of the other and then use this information in court in a divorce trial. Obtaining an order that prohibits use of the tracking applications should prevent any use at trial of this type of information.
Any time a household breaks up and results in a divorce or other litigation the parties should consult an experienced family law attorney. This attorney can give advice and propose a course of action to minimize problems from smart technology and to obtain a court order to prohibit abuse by smart technology.
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